The W. Edwards Deming Institute Blog

Posts Tagged ‘business’

Baking Apple Pies Using the Deming Management System

Paula Marshall, the CEO of the Bama Companies, discusses her adoption of Deming principles at Bama Companies. In the podcast she discusses going to see a Dr. Deming 4 day seminar in 1990 and then working with him for 3 years on bringing new management thinking to the Bama Companies. And she continues with the […]

What Would Deserve a Raise Within the Deming Management Context?

Response to a question on the Deming Institute LinkedIn group: let’s say Dr. Deming wanted to sit down with his boss to negotiate a compensation increase. What grounds would he use to justify the request? I believe he would explain how the value he brought to the system was worth a raise. For example, a […]

Lessons From the Red Bead Experiment with Dr. Deming

The lessons that can be illustrated using the Red Bead experiment are too many to include in this post. But we can touch on a few of the ideas. The value of the Red Bead Experiment is to provide focus to your thinking. It is hard to believe what the full Red Bead Experiment is […]

Process Thinking at Patagonia

Randy Harward spoke at the 2013 Deming Institute annual conference on applying Deming management methods and sustainability and Patagonia. It was better because designers and developers went from being just people who bought things, and marketed them, to people who had to understand and solve problems throughout the whole process. They became process engineers, every […]

Applying Deming’s Management Thinking at Patagonia

Randy Harward spoke at the 2013 Deming Institute annual conference on applying Deming management methods and sustainability and Patagonia. I was hired to take care of this huge volume of returns coming back from customers, we had so many quality problems. I was managing customer service and all the systems required to handle this huge […]

Support of Top Management is Not Sufficient

Support of top management is not sufficient. It is not enough that top management comity themselves for life to quality and productivity. They must know what it is that they are committed to — that is, what they must do. These obligations can not be delegated. Support is not enough: action is required. – W. […]